Tag Archives: Jan Pienkowski

Friday Pick{ture Book} #2: Haunted House

Haunted House: Jan Pienkowski
(Walker Books, 1980, 2005)

It’s Friday 13th so a spooky choice this week! This was one of my birthday presents last year that I begged for in a fit of nostalgia 😆

 “No, I don’t have many visitors.”

I don’t think we had a copy of this book in the house when I was younger (and I grew up in a house packed with books) but I must have read this at school or from the library. I was 5 when it was published, so I would have been older than that when I read played with it!

This really is a classic must-have book by the amazingly talented Jan Pienkowski. You could share it with younger children but as I like my pop-up books to stay in one piece, I prefer it to be left until 5+. Besides, as I said, this is one of my books!

What can I say? This isn’t a book to be read so much as played with. It consists of six spooky double-paged spreads. There’s some text, but it doesn’t matter what it says particularly, this book is all about pulling tabs and opening doors and turning wheels and monsters popping out at you. An utterly perfect pop-up book. Not for the faint hearted of course, but we don’t have those in the Chaos household 😉

Grab the badge code and see the rules here, and enter your link below:

I’m Looking for a Book about… Space

It’s the third “I’m looking for a book about…” carnival from Playing by the Book and this month’s theme is Space.

There is obviously a discrepancy between what I think is on my shelves and what is actually on my shelves because I thought we had loads of books on Fairies (but found none), and loads on Space (but not as many as I thought) and none on the Seaside, Beaches and Oceans (but found far more than on any other subject so must go back and enter that carnival…)

Welcome to Alien School by Caryl Hart and Ed Eaves.

The third of a series of books about Albie, an ordinary boy who extraordinary things happen to. We’ve previously reviewed this book.

 

You Can’t Eat a Princess! by Gillian Rogerson & Sarah McIntyre.

Since reviewing, we now own our own copy of both You Can’t Eat a Princess! and You Can’t Scare a Princess! and they are both still very well loved.

 

Winnie in Space by Valerie Thomas and Korky Paul.

Winnie the Witch! In space! What’s not to love? I am a huge fan of Korky Paul’s work, the details are wonderful and make re-reading books a joy. Winnie in Space is the eleventh Winnie book. Valerie Thomas’ text is spot on, these are proper picture books with text and pictures telling the stories together.

In Winnie in Space, Winnie conjures a rocket and off Winnie and Wilbur go for a picnic. But, oh no, space rabbits are coming to the picnic! “Chocolate Muffins? Disgusting. Cherries? Yuck!” but space rockets? Yum! How will Winnie and Wilbur get home after the rabbits have chewed their rocket up?

Every page also has a picture of a planet or object from the solar system with their astronomical symbols, a nice touch to lead to further study if your child shows an interest.

Meg on the Moon by Helen Nicol and Jan Pienkowski.

It’s Mog’s birthday and for his birthday treat he wants to go in a space ship.  Meg makes a spell (that works!) and off they go. This book actually covers a lot of educational activities: counting down from 10 for lift off; weightlessness in space; moon buggy, lunar module and spacesuits; food in bags; jumping high with the moon’s lower gravity; what the Earth looks like from space… Another gem of a book.

Basher’s Astronomy by Dan Green and Simon Basher.

I love these Basher Books, I’ve not written about them before because they’re too old for my girls but I’ve been collecting them nonetheless because they are brilliant. Manga-style characters with simplified explanations of the concepts they represent. This book deserves a post to itself

Finally a free book to download (or buy in physical form) for early readers: Tick Tock Little Facts Blast Off! Lots of photos of real space images and only 100 words for new readers to attempt themselves.

There is also a series of books about the solar system from the same publishers for early readers who want to read a bit more detail.

Next month’s carnival theme is (Starting) School. Thank-you Zoe for these carnivals, it’s been great fun thinking of books to fit each theme!

Fiction Fridays #28: Meg’s Eggs

FF#28
Meg’s Eggs: Helen Nicoll & Jan Pienkowski (1972)

It was suppertime, so Meg got out her cauldron.

Read more about Fiction Fridays here.
Like to take part? Read the rules and guidelines and get the badge here.

Photobucket
Extra Info:
Meg and Mog is a book I loved from my childhood, and one I included in my Six Books posts. But the others in the series are also fantastic. I love Jan Pienkowski‘s art, and MG honed in on him as a favourite artist from a young age (along with Nick Sharratt and Lucy Cousins).

MG at 5 months old, with Meg’s Eggs

Meg’s Eggs is a favourite of both MG and DG, and has been for a long time. We used to have a board book version but it was loved into bits 😉 No wonder this one is a favourite, it has dinosaurs!

Meg makes a spell to get eggs for supper but the eggs are too big and they can’t open them, but then… There is one small thing that annoys me about this book: at the end Meg uses bacon and eggs to make a spell to save them from the dinosaurs, but if she already had bacon and eggs why didn’t they have that for supper?! 😆

A lovely book, another essential along with the original Meg and Mog. We have nine of the stories plus two ladybird books with stories from the animated series and all are well loved. The animated series is well worth getting too: five minute episodes so they’re good pre-bedtime treats (who am I kidding, my two sit and watch the entire DVD…) or to get five minutes peace. Made by Absolutely in 2004 the series is available on two DVDs for around £3 each, a complete bargain.

I’ve just realised that there are seven out of print Jan Pienkowski books available to read online here, including Owl at the Vet. The Jan Pienkowski books we own probably deserve a blog to themselves one day… 😉

Six Books

Six picture books from my childhood that I bought for my children

1. The Very Hungry Caterpillar – Eric Carle (1969)
This was the first book I bought for my then unborn first child. It’s just an essential book for every child. I remember as a child loving the different sized pages and the holes where the caterpillar has munched through. The art is gorgeous and iconic. Not only that, but it also teaches the lifecycle of a butterfly, counting, days of the week… It is an absolutely perfect book. So much so, I think I may upgrade the board book version we have to a paperback version so it can be enjoyed in our house for many more years to come.

2. Meg and Mog – Helen Nicol & Jan Pienkowski (1972)
I still love Jan Pienkovski’s art and our house is packed with examples of his work from Meg and Mog to pop-up Haunted House; from 1001 First Words to The One Thousand Nights and One Night… But this is where is all began for me, with the story of Meg the witch, her cat Mog, Owl and the spells that never work out. There’s nothing not to love about the Meg and Mog books but the first one is my special favourite, it’s probably one of the first books I read independently. The fantastic easy to read lettering and the bright contrasting colours means it catches the attention of even very young babies. I never tire of reading it.

3. My Cat Likes to Hide in Boxes – Eve Sutton & Lynley Dodd (1974)
I always wonder what happened to Eve Sutton, I don’t think she wrote any other children’s books. Lynley Dodd of course went on to create the fantastic Hairy Maclary series plus many more. But this is still my favourite of her books. The Cat from France may well like to sing and dance but MY cat likes to hide in boxes, and that’s just fine with me.

4. Mog the Forgetful Cat – Judith Kerr (1970)
It seems to me that most people think The Tiger Who Came To Tea when they think of Judith Kerr, but it was always the Mog books for me. I love cats, we had a tabby cat, and I love how poor Mog accidentally saves the day in this story. Mog is such a lovable character in all her stories that I can’t bring myself to read Goodbye Mog (2002) as I know I’ll just sob the whole way through. Fortunately there are many more Mog books that I also haven’t read that I will get to share with my girls at some point, but this is the one I read and re-read as a child.

5. Big Sister and Little Sister – Charlotte Zolotow & Martha Alexander (1966)
I am a little sister with a big sister, which is probaby why I loved this book. I remember reading it when i was about 8, it was borrowed from the library and I tried to copy all the words before it was returned but never finished. It’s one of those random old memories: sitting at the bottom of the stairs reading this book. At 36 I no longer think of myself as being the ‘little sister’ but by virtue of birth order Destructo-Girl is and I think she will relate to this story too. Most importantly, I hope my girls do learn from each other so that they too ‘both know how’.

6. Dogger – Shirley Hughes (1977)
Dogger, the well-loved toy who gets lost. With one ear in the air and one folded over, Dogger was quite like a pet dog we had at the time. I loved this story of losing a favourite thing and regaining it, the kind big sister and the wonderful pictures that take me back to being very young. I still love the story and am happy to read it again and again to my girls.

All these books are still in print (except for possibly Big Sister and Little Sister) and will probably be on the shelves of your local independent bookshop, although Big Sister and Little Sister can still be found new online. I recommend them all for books to be treasured and to not get boring as you read them again, and again, and again…

What books from your childhood did you keep or buy again for your own children? Please comment and share your favourites!